An Accent

Blending in is rather simple when no words are spoken.

To open your mouth for a few choice words is when they take notice.

The accent, the accent.

Where are you from, one of the first questions asked when they hear the accent.

Talk some more, one of the few requests made once they hear the accent.

Across the Atlantic they’ll know you’re from the UK by the sound of the accent.

In Scotland, Ireland or Wales they know your from England by the sound of the accent.

Lancashire, Berkshire, Yorkshire and the West Midlands will know you’re from London by sound of the accent.

In Barnet, Enfield, Islington and Hounslow they know you’re from south London by the sound of the accent.

It seems the closer you are to home the more they are able hone in on the geographical location of the accent.

Through conversation we implore to come across clear and concise, anunciating tongue twisting syllables yet we are still able to differenciate between our accents.

Simply because the mother tongue is strong and will not let go.

The sounds of residued cockney, Patois, twee or wahala are taken in from the household.

I’ll let you finish this poem to understand what is meant.

Puntuations are used in names from beginning, middle to end.

Emphasise it’s sound with clear intent.

What’s that above the “e” on my name?

André Reid

An Accent (Audio)

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